Red Bull plan to reignite Ferrari engine saga

Date published: April 1 2020

Ferrari's engine "not as strong" as last year says Mattia Binotto.

Formula 1 may be in lockdown, but when the sport gets back up and running again, Red Bull will be ready with more questions about Ferrari’s 2019 engine.

Before more immediate and more pressing matters affected the world, Red Bull were all set to challenge their two major rivals, Mercedes and Ferrari, on a couple of issues ahead of the new season starting in Australia.

Red Bull were going to launch an official protest with the FIA once Mercedes had first used their dual-axis steering system during a race weekend and were going to continue to probe the governing body on their investigation into Ferrari’s engine.

The Scuderia’s power unit was seized for further inspection at the end of 2019 as suspicions aroused as to whether the engine they used throughout the season was in fact legal.

The FIA did nothing to extinguish the flames surrounding the issue when publicly announcing that they had come to a ‘private agreement’ with Ferrari for the future, with ex-Ferrari boss turned FIA president, Jean Todt, heavily involved in the process of the special agreement being arranged.

Unsurprisingly, that did not sit particularly well with the seven non-Ferrari powered Formula 1 teams and, although Mercedes has agreed a truce with the Scuderia, Red Bull are not going to let the issue drop.

“At the moment that [the Ferrari engine] is secondary to the issues F1 is facing,” Horner told BBC Sport.

“We want to deal with everything else and then that will be picked up and addressed at a later date.

“We have raised some questions to the FIA.

“What I would say is that a confidential agreement regarding the technical compliance of a competitor’s car is obviously something that raises questions.

“And I’m sure at the relevant time we will have a conversation with Jean to try to understand why and what that agreement consists of.”

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