Glock tells Steiner to ‘get the team under control’

Michelle Foster
Mick Schumacher, Haas, pulls into pits. Silverstone July 2022

Timo Glock has slammed Haas after a minor mistake aligning Mick Schumacher’s steering wheel left the German down in 19th place in qualifying for the British Grand Prix.

Schumacher showed pace in Saturday’s final practice, putting his VF-22 up inside the top ten.

However, it all fell apart in qualifying where he just didn’t have the pace in the rain.

He was eliminated in Q1, his best time over 3.5s off the pace and seven-tenths too slow to make it into Q2.

The 23-year-old revealed his lack of pace was due to a “small mistake” that created a “big” problem.

“The car,” he told Sky Germany, “wasn’t quite what we had hoped for. That’s a small mistake, which unfortunately has a big impact. Now we have to catch up more in the race.”

That small mistake was that the steering wheel was crooked. “We have to fix that, otherwise it will be a tough race,” he added.

Sky Sports pundit and former F1 driver Glock was fuming over it.

At a time when Schumacher is trying to break his duck on F1’s scorecard, the German said: “I can’t stand here as a team boss, like Guenther Steiner, and point my finger at the driver.

“I have to look at my own first, grab my nose and try to get the team under control to put my driver in a good package.

“That should be the goal of Guenther Steiner and his team at the moment.”

Glock went onto to explain the major impact the small error had, leaving Schumacher P19 on the British Grand Prix grid.

“Apparently a mechanic made a mistake when measuring the car. If the track is misaligned, then nothing fits together. If the steering wheel is to the left or right, then the wheels are wrong. That’s just a no-go,” he explained.

“You can’t drive a top lap with this problem at the end. The problem is that it behaves differently from left to right corners. Mick also indicated that.

“In the left corners he had more understeer, in the right corners more oversteer. That’s the worst-case scenario that can happen in qualifying. In the end, it’s a clear mistake by the team that has a major impact on the car’s performance.
“That must not happen to the team – and above all not with this frequency. The error rate is higher for the team than for Mick.”

Glock highlighted other errors that had come from the team.

“First of all, a flawless job has to happen so that Mick has the opportunity to have a flawless weekend. There are always things that go wrong on the team side.

“Like in Barcelona where you put two different springs in the rear and then he has a bad balance and is bad in qualifying. Same as here. Then there were the technical problems in Canada. These are all issues that come from the team, which in turn gave Mick a bad start to the weekend.

“It happened more often that he stopped somewhere after two minutes on a Friday in the 1st practice session is,such as in Azerbaijan.”